HerStory 360° Challenge: 90 days, 90 stories, 90 women, 90th anniversary!

 

2010 was the 30th anniversary of the National Women's History Project and the 90th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment, giving women across the US the right to vote.

 

To celebrate the 90th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment, the HerStory 360° Challenge published 90 stories, during the first 90 days of 2010, about 90 women who fought for suffrage. Each story includes links to rare source material to answer the question: "What's Her Story?"

 

HerStory360 is on:     

 

Tip: To find something specific in the HerStory 360° Challenge, use the Find command on the Edit menu of your browser (Ctrl+F on PCs or Command+F on Macs).

Q90. What’s Her Story?

 

March 31 — She was born in 1882 in Cincinnati, OH, but grew up in Detroit, MI. At the age of 18, she married a Baptist minister and joined him in his missionary work in India and Burma. When they returned to the US, she continued her work with the underprivileged. In 1910, the family moved to Oregon, and she became an organizer and lecturer for the women's suffrage movement. After women in Oregon won the right to vote in 1912, she traveled across the country, in an early automobile, campaigning for the National Woman's Party. When the Nineteenth Amendment granted the right to vote to women across the US, the National Woman's Party gave to the nation a statue of Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony, to be included in the Capitol rotunda. On February 15, 1921, the 101st anniversary of the birth of Susan B. Anthony, she gave the speech at the presentation of the suffrage statue. Who was she?

 

a. Victoria Woodhull

b. Laura Beasley

c. Sara Bard Field

d. Helen N. Bates

 

Links for Her Story: Presenting to Congress on behalf of the Women of the Nation

                             Poet and Suffragist

 

 

 

Q89. What’s Her Story?

 

March 30 — The final fight for suffrage came down to the Tennessee State House. Only one more state was needed to ratify the Federal Woman Suffrage Amendment, and the Tennessee Senate had already voted to ratify it. On August 18, 1920, one representative in the Tennessee House, who had earlier voted with the anti-suffrage forces, changed his position and voted in favor of the Suffrage Amendment. The result was a forty-nine to forty-seven vote for suffrage, and the Amendment was ratified. The 24-year-old representative, who changed his position on suffrage, said he did so because his mother wrote him a letter, which said:

 

"Hurrah and vote for suffrage and don't keep them in doubt. I noticed Chandler's speech, it was very bitter. I’ve been waiting to see how you stood but have not seen anything yet." ... "Don’t forget to be a good boy, and help Mrs. 'Thomas Catt' [Carrie Chapman Catt] with her 'Rats'. Is she the one who put the rat in ratification, Ha! No more from mama this time. With lots of love, Mama."

 

Who was she?

 

a. Lucy Burns

b. Febb Ensminger Burn

c. Sara Barnwell Elliott

d. Abby Scott Baker

 

Links for Her Story: Her Letter to Her Son

                             The Story of the Woman's Party

 

 

Q88. What’s Her Story?

 

March 29 — She was born in Tennessee in 1887. She graduated from Georgie Robertson Christian College in 1904 and West Tennessee Business College in 1905. She joined the women's suffrage campaign in 1912, working for the Tennessee Equal Suffrage Association. In 1918, she became a member of the National Woman's Party (NWP) and moved to Washington, DC. In a NWP demonstration across from the White House in 1919, she burned President Wilson in effigy and was jailed. She became part of the NWP's suffrage speaking tour, dubbed the "Prison Special". Later, she edited the newspaper of the NWP, The Suffragist. In 1920, she led the NWP's fight in Tennessee to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment. Who was she?

 

a. Ida B. Wells

b. Frankie J. Pierce

c. Anne Dallas Dudley

d. Sue Shelton White

 

Links for Her Story: Jailed for Freedom

                             The New York Times, February 10, 1919

 

 

Q87. What’s Her Story?

 

March 28 — Between 1897 and 1911, this mother and daughter team filled seven scrapbooks with original documents, memorabilia, and newspaper clippings from the women's suffrage movement. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was a cousin of these women who lived in Geneva, NY, near Seneca Falls where the first Woman's Rights Convention was held in the US in 1848. This mother and daughter team was active in state and local suffrage efforts. In 1897, the elder member of the duo persuaded the New York State Woman’s Suffrage Association to hold its annual convention in Geneva, NY. Shortly after that, her daughter helped to organize the Geneva Political Equality Club (GPEC). Who were they?

 

a. Elizabeth Smith Miller and Anne Fitzhugh Miller

b. Harriet Forten Purvis and Harriet (Hattie) Purvis

c. Ida Husted Harper and Winnifred Harper Cooley

d. Lucy Branham and Lucy Gwynne Branham

 

Links for Her Story: National American Woman Suffrage Association Scrapbooks

                             Women’s Rights, National Historical Park, New York

 

 

 

Q86. What’s Her Story?

 

March 27 — She was born on March 27, 1824 in St. Louis, MO. In 1868, when the Fourteenth Amendment gave citizenship to freed slaves and guaranteed the rights of citizens to all persons born or naturalized in the US, the suffragists reasoned that women were citizens and citizens had the right to vote. So, in 1872, she attempted to register to vote in Missouri, but was turned away. Meanwhile, Susan B. Anthony registered and voted in Rochester, NY along with several other women, including her three sisters. Anthony was arrested for voting illegally and was found guilty in Federal Court. She had hoped her case would go to the US Supreme Court, but she was denied an appeal. So, Susan B. Anthony petitioned Congress to have the imposed fine remitted. However, this woman, who was barred from voting in Missouri, filed a lawsuit and ultimately took her case to the US Supreme Court in 1875. Nonetheless, the Court ruled that the right to vote was not necessarily a privilege of all citizens and that each state could determine who could vote in that state. So, she continued to fight for suffrage in Missouri. Who was she?

 

a. Beverly Allen

b. Rebecca Hazzard

c. Virginia L. Minor

d. Addie Johnson

 

Links for Her Story: The New York Times, February 10, 1875

                             United States Supreme Court Reports, Book 22

                             The Trial of Susan B. Anthony

                             Petition from Susan B. Anthony to US Congress

 

 

Q85. What’s Her Story?

 

March 26 — She was born in Mississippi in 1894. She graduated from Whitworth College in Mississippi and studied law at National University, which is now George Washington University. While in law school, she became interested in women's suffrage, and she regularly picketed the White House on behalf of women's suffrage. Because she was in law school, she feared being arrested while picketing "for speaking without a permit to speak." After women won the right to vote across the US, she wrote a series of papers for the National Woman's Party which described how laws in different states discriminated against women. She helped with the wording of the original Equal Rights Amendment proposed by Alice Paul in 1923, on the 75th anniversary of the First Woman's Rights Convention in the US. She was the first woman to become a judge on the Federal District Court, nominated for the District of Columbia court by President Truman in 1949. Who was she?

 

a. Florence Ellinwood Allen

b. Burnita Shelton Matthews

c. Mary Ann Shadd Cary

d. Martha Hughes Cannon

 

Links for Her Story: Pathfinder in the Legal Aspects of Women

                             The New York Times, April 28, 1988

 

 

 

Q84. What’s Her Story?

 

March 25 — She was born in 1876 in Indianapolis. She graduated from DePauw University and was president of her class. She married in 1900 and accompanied her husband to England where she was introduced to the social movements of the day, including the women's suffrage movement. When she returned to the US, she focused on improving the labor conditions for working women. She became a member of the executive committee of Alice Paul's organization beginning in 1913. She was an editor of the National Woman's Party's weekly publication, The Suffragist. With her husband, she wrote The History of the United States, which was published in 1921 and included chapters on the women's movement and women's suffrage. She also wrote several books on her own including, Woman's Work in Municipalities, America Through Women's Eyes, and Woman As Force In History: A Study in Traditions and Realities. Who was she?

 

a. Joy Young

b. Pauline Clarke

c. Mary Ritter Beard

d. Nina Allender

 

Links for Her Story: History of the United States

                             Woman's Work in Municipalities

 

 

 

Q83. What’s Her Story?

 

March 24 — She was born in Nevada in 1875.  She earned bachelor degrees from Nevada State University and Stanford University. She taught at Nevada State University, but left to study at other universities in New York and abroad. While in England, she became involved in the women's suffrage movement. She returned to Nevada and was elected president of the Nevada Equal Franchise Society in 1912. She led the campaign that won suffrage for women in Nevada in 1914. She became chairman of the Woman's Party in 1916, and when the National Woman's Party (NWP) was formed by merging the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage with the Woman's Party, in 1917 she became vice-chairman of the newly-formed NWP and Alice Paul became the chairman. In 1917, she was arrested and jailed for picketing the White House. In 1918, she ran for one of the US Senate seats from Nevada, but she was defeated. Who was she?

 

a. Sadie D. Hurst

b. Mary Austin

c. Bird M. Wilson

d. Anne Henrietta Martin

 

Links for Her Story: The History of Nevada, Volume II

                             The Clash in Nevada

 

 

 

Q82. What’s Her Story?

 

March 23 — She was born in 1872 in Massachusetts. She attended public schools and studied at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. She won several prizes for tapestry and leather design. She got interested in suffrage for women and served as the field secretary of the Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association. In 1910, she became the corresponding secretary and chairman of the Literature Committee of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). She was responsible for producing and distributing millions of suffrage pamphlets. In 1915, she co-founded the National Birth Control League, at a time when communicating information about birth control was illegal. Prior to the US entry into World War I, she became a board member of the Woman's Peace Party. But, she is best known for her focus on birth control education. Who was she?

 

a. Jessie Ashley

b. Margaret Sanger

c. Mary Coffin Ware Dennett

d. Clara Gruening Stillman

 

Links for Her Story: The Sex Side of Life

                             History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V

 

 

 

Q81. What’s Her Story?

 

March 22 — She was born in 1871 and became one of Alice Paul's earliest associates. She helped Alice Paul and Lucy Burns to plan the 1913 suffrage parade in Washington, DC. And, before the 1916 presidential election, she traveled on the "Suffrage Special" train to the Western states, where women had already won the right to vote, to campaign against President Wilson for delaying women's suffrage. She was one of the early White House picketers, and was arrested and jailed in September in 1917. She became the political chair of the National Woman's Party in 1918. In that role, she was responsible of lobbying the members of Congress to vote in favor of suffrage. She became known as the diplomat of the National Woman's Party. Who was she?

 

a. Laura Moore

b. Abby Scott Baker

c. Belle Kearney

d. Anna Laskey

 

Link for Her Story: The New York Times, May 25, 1919

 

 

 

Q80. What’s Her Story?

 

March 21 — She was born in Indiana in 1857 and became a prominent member of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). She worked with Carrie Chapman Catt to campaign for suffrage in California. After that, she became president of the New York Equal Suffrage League in 1910 and president of the New York City Woman Suffrage Party in 1912. Due in large part to her efforts, the men in New York State granted full suffrage to the women in the state in 1917. As a result, because New York was so populous, the number of women in the US with full suffrage nearly doubled. In 1919, she became chair of the Republican Women's National Executive Committee. She also led the New York City League of Women Voters beginning in 1918. Who was she?

 

a. Louisine Waldron Elder Havemeyer

b. Helen Hamilton Gardener

c. Mary Garrett Hay

d. Laura Clay

 

Links for Her Story: The New York Times, June 15, 1919

                             Politics, A Profession for Women

 

 

 

Q79. What’s Her Story?

 

March 20 — She was born in Illinois in 1848. At the age of eight, her family brought her to hear a speech by Susan B. Anthony. In 1880, she married and moved to the Dakota Territory. Susan B. Anthony stayed in her home while campaigning for suffrage in the Dakota Territory. In 1895, she began working as a paid organizer for the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) and helped to win full suffrage for women in Idaho in 1896. In 1905, she and her husband moved to Tacoma, Washington, and a year later, she became president of the Washington Equal Suffrage Association. Due to her leadership, in 1910, women in Washington State won full suffrage. In 1911, she formed the National Council of Women Voters, which included members from the five Western states where women had won the right to vote. Who was she?

 

a. Mary Olney Brown

b. Emma Smith DeVoe

c. Catharine Paine Blaine

d. Alice Lord

 

Link for Her Story: Washington Women's History

 

 

 

Q78. What’s Her Story?

 

March 19 — She was born in Texas on March 19, 1882. She graduated with a degree in pharmacy from the University of Texas and was one of the first women in Texas to work as a pharmacist. Because of the inequalities in pay between men and women, she became interested in suffrage for women. She was elected president of the Galveston Equal Suffrage Association, and the Texas Equal Suffrage Association. She was the driving force for winning partial suffrage for women in Texas, where women were allowed to vote in primary elections and nominating conventions beginning in 1918. After the suffrage win in Texas, she began to work with the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) for the passage of the Federal Suffrage Amendment. She was also a founding leader of the League of Women Voters. In 1928, she ran for the US Senate. Who was she?

 

a. Althea Jones

b. Minnie Fisher Cunningham

c. Annette Finnigan

d. Pearl Penfield

 

Links for Her Story: The Texas Women's Hall of Fame

                             History of Woman Suffrage, Volume VI 

 

 

 

Q77. What’s Her Story?

 

March 18 — She was born in Virginia in 1844 and educated at the convent of Mont de Chantal in West Virginia. As a young woman, she became a teacher. In 1917, she traveled from Jacksonville, FL to Washington, DC to fight for suffrage. She was 73 years old, with a lame foot, when she was arrested for picketing the White House on November 10, 1917. She was tried and sentenced to jail. On November 14, 1917, during the "Night of Terror" in the Occoquan Workhouse, she was dragged down a hall and thrown into a cell without regard for the frailties of her age or her lame foot. She was arrested and jailed again in January 1919 for demonstrating for suffrage. She was the oldest woman jailed for campaigning for suffrage. In February 1919, she toured the country as part of the "Prison Special", describing her experiences being imprisoned for suffrage. Who was she?

 

a. Lucille Shields

b. Lenna Lowe Yost

c. Mary A. Nolan

d. Mary Reed

 

Link for Her Story: Jailed for Freedom

 

 

 

Q76. What’s Her Story?

 

March 17 — She was born into a prominent family in Illinois in 1860. She studied in Europe, but graduated from Rockford Female Seminary in Illinois. In 1889, she co-founded Hull House, the first settlement house to assist the poor in the US. She fought against child labor and for worker's rights. She worked for women's suffrage in the US and abroad, attending international conferences and speaking before the US Congress. And, she was a charter member of the NAACP. She was also an outspoken pacifist against World War I, who advocated for the formation of the League of Nations after the war. In 1931, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Who was she?

 

a. Jane Lawson

b. Jane Addams

c. Pauline Adams

d. Sadie L. Adams

 

Links for Her Story: Women in Public Life

Woman Suffrage: Hearings before the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives

 

 

 

Q75. What’s Her Story?

 

March 16 — She was born in Wilmington, DE in 1883, went to the Quaker Wilmington Friends School, and attended Swarthmore College with Alice Paul. Before joining the suffrage movement in 1913, she taught German and Latin. She was a talented speaker, who campaigned across the country for the National Woman's Party. In 1916, she was one of the women who disrupted President Wilson's speech to a joint a session of Congress by unfurling a banner from the balcony in the Capitol. The banner asked, "Mr. President, what will you do for woman suffrage?" In 1917, she began the picketing of the White House and was one of the first groups of women jailed. In 1918, she managed the election campaign for Anne Martin, who ran for the US Senate from Nevada, where women had won full suffrage. Who was she?

 

a. Annie J. Magee

b. Florence Bayard Hilles

c. Ellen Winsor

d. Mabel Vernon

 

Link for Her Story: Speaker for Suffrage and Petitioner for Peace

  

 

 

Q74. What’s Her Story?

 

March 15 — On March 15, 1906, this community leader and close friend of Susan B. Anthony, spoke at the funeral of Susan B. Anthony, who had passed away two days earlier. She was the only African-American woman to speak at the ceremony. Shortly after that, she helped to establish first memorial to Susan B. Anthony, a stained glass window at the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Zion church in Rochester, NY.  Her association with Anthony was later used by the anti-suffragists as an argument against suffrage for women, because universal suffrage for women would mean black women would have the right to vote. Who was she?

 

a. Hester C. Jeffrey (Mrs. R. Jerome Jeffrey)

b. Nancy Prince

c. Lethia C. Fleming

d. Julia Dorsey

 

Link for Her Story: The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, Volume III

 

 

 

Q73. What’s Her Story?

 

March 14 — She was born in New Mexico in 1881 to a prosperous family who traced their roots to eleventh-century Spain. She attended Maryville College in St. Louis. In 1914, she joined the Congressional Union led by Alice Paul. Working in New Mexico, she was able to appeal to both the English- and Spanish-speaking populations on behalf of women's suffrage. Her campaigning helped to convince the state legislators to ratify the Federal Woman's Suffrage Amendment in February 1920. She was one of New Mexico's first women in government, as Santa Fe Superintendent of Instruction, and chair of the State Board of Health. Later, she was appointed by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt as state director of the Federal Civilian Conservation Corps. In 1936, she wrote the book, Old Spain in Our Southwest. Who was she?

 

a. Nina Allender

b. Isabella Beecher Hooker

c. Adelina "Nina" Otero-Warren

d. Nina Samarodin

 

Links for Her Story: History of Woman Suffrage, Volume VI

                             Old Spain in Our Southwest

  

 

 

Q72. What’s Her Story?

 

March 13 — Seventy-two years after the Declaration of Independence was written in 1776, the Declaration of Sentiments was written and presented at the First Woman's Rights Convention in the US in 1848. It took another seventy-two years, until 1920, before the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified, giving women across the US the right to vote. And, it took another seventy-two years before more than two women would serve simultaneously in the US Senate. The press dubbed 1992 "The Year of the Woman" when twenty-three women were elected to first terms in the US House of Representatives and four women were elected to the US Senate. The first woman to serve in the US Senate was a suffragist appointed by the governor of Georgia to fill an empty seat in 1922. She served for a 24-hour period, and then was replaced by the winner of a special election to fill the open seat. She is the only woman who has ever served in the US Senate from Georgia. Who was she?

 

a. Rebecca Latimer Felton

b. Mary Latimer McLendon

c. Lugenia Burns Hope

d. Victoria Earle Matthews

 

Link for Her Story: My Memoirs of Georgia Politics

 

 

 

Q71. What’s Her Story?

 

March 12 — She was born Ruza Wenclawska in Poland, but later she Americanized her name after her parents brought her to the US. She began working in a mill at the age of eleven and subsequently became a trade union organization. She joined the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, which was the precursor of the National Woman's Party. She was an impressive orator and helped to organize working women to campaign for suffrage. She was arrested with Alice Paul for picketing the White House. While in prison with Alice Paul, the two of them began a hunger strike and they were brutally force-fed. Who was she?

 

a. Rose Fishstein

b. Rose Schneiderman

c. Mary Winsor

d. Rose Winslow

 

Links for Her Story: Jailed for Freedom

                            The Story of the Woman's Party

  

 

 

Q70. What’s Her Story?

 

March 11 — She was born in 1870 in San Francisco, CA. Although she came from a wealthy family, she took up the cause of worker's rights, forming San Francisco's first waitress union in 1908 and helping to pass California's eight-hour workday law. She was one of the founders of the Wage Earners' Equal Suffrage League for Working Women. In 1913, she joined the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, which later became the National Woman's Party (NWP). She gave the keynote speech when the National Woman's Party was formed, and she spoke at the memorial service for Inez Milholland Boissevain in the US Capitol. She became head of the NWP Lobby Committee, which developed a comprehensive profile on index cards for every member of Congress, every governor, and key state legislators. Who was she?

 

a. Maud Younger

b. Minnie D. Abbott

c. Pauline Adams

d. Joy Young

 

Links for Her Story: The New York Times, March 2, 1919

                                    The New York Times, September 7, 1919

 

  

 

Q69. What’s Her Story?

 

March 10 — She was born on March 10, 1829 into a Quaker family and grew up in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, south of Philadelphia. At the age of fourteen, she became an assistant teacher, and two years later, she became one of the principals. She married in 1855 and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. She and her husband were both abolitionists, and in 1856, they helped the first territorial governor of Kansas escape from a pro-slavery, murderous mob. She campaigned for many social issues, including better conditions for the mentally ill. Between 1870 and 1896, when traveling to the Mid-West or West, Susan B. Anthony often stayed at this woman's home. In 1892, she formed the Equal Suffrage Association of Kansas City. Who was she?

 

a. Virginia L. Minor

b. Sarah Walter Chandler Coates

c. Phoebe Couzins

d. Addie M. Johnson

 

Links for Her Story: In Memoriam

                             Missouri Historical Review, Volume XIV

  

 

Q68. What’s Her Story?

 

March 9 — She was born in 1844 in Milwaukee, WI. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1866 and then a master's degree from North Western Female College. In 1872, she married, but her husband died three years later. After that, she became involved in the women's suffrage movement, and she helped found the Indianapolis Equal Suffrage Society in 1878. In 1880, she remarried, and with her husband, founded the Girls' Classical School in Indianapolis, IN. She was elected president of the National Congress of Women in 1897 and president of the International Congress of Women in 1899. She wrote several books and lectured on women's rights. Who was she?

 

a. Lily Wilkinson Thompson

b. Elsie Vervane

c. May Wright Sewall

d. Lenna Lowe Yost

 

Links for Her Story: The World's Congress of Representative Women

                             The International Council of Women: from 1899 to 1904

                             Her Papers

 

 

 

Q67. What’s Her Story?

 

March 8 — She was born in New York State in 1830. She began teaching school at the age of 14 and was married at 18 years old, but her husband died within five years. She decided she needed a better education to support her young daughter, so she enrolled in Genesee Wesleyan Seminary and then Genesee College. She was later admitted to the new National University Law School, which is now the George Washington University Law School. In 1879, she became the first woman to be allowed to practice before the US Supreme Court. She won a $5 million settlement in a case involving the Cherokee people versus the US Government. She was an advocate for suffrage for women, and in 1884 and 1888, she ran for President of the US on the ticket of the Equal Rights Party. Who was she?

 

a. Arabella Mansfield

b. Belva Ann Lockwood

c. Victoria Woodhull

d. Charlotte E. Ray

 

Links for Her Story: The Right of Women to Vote

                             Peace and the Outlook

                             The New York Times, May 20, 1917

 

 

 

Q66. What’s Her Story?

 

March 7 — She was born in Orange, NJ in 1857. Both her parents were suffragists and helped to found the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA). Her aunt was the first woman to graduate from medical school in the United States. In 1881, she graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Boston University and joined the editorial staff of the Woman’s Journal, which was published by AWSA. She urged her mother to merge the AWSA with the National Woman Suffrage Association, founded by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. The two organizations merged in 1980 to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association. After her mother died, she wrote her mother's biography. Who was she?

 

a. Katharine A. Morey

b. Eva Weaver

c. Alice Stone Blackwell

d. Eliza Wright Osborne

 

Links for Her Story: Woman's Journal Articles

                             Woman's Journal

 

  

 

Q65. What’s Her Story?

 

March 6 — She was born in New York in 1879. She graduated from Vassar College and attended Yale University. While studying in Europe in 1909, she joined the English suffragist movement, where she met another American student, Alice Paul. She was imprisoned four times in England for employing the tactics of the radical British suffragettes. She worked with Alice Paul to plan the massive suffrage parade in Washington, DC in 1913, and they formed the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage. She led most of the suffrage demonstrations in front of the White House, and she was imprisoned more than any other suffragist in the US. Who was she?

 

a. Vida Milholland

b. Mary Winsor

c. Edith Aigne

d. Lucy Burns

 

Links for Her Story: The Story of the Woman's Party

                             Jailed for Freedom

 

 

 

Q64. What’s Her Story?

 

March 5 — She was born in Omaha, NE and graduated from Oberlin College in 1911. She initially worked as a teacher and social worker, and joined the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). In 1914, she started working for the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, which later became the National Woman's Party. She campaigned for suffrage in several states including Rhode Island, Colorado, and California. She was arrested and jailed for picketing the White House in 1917. She wrote the book, Jailed for Freedom, which described the imprisonment of the suffragists in the National Woman's Party. She later married Dudley Field Malone, who was a prominent lawyer who resigned his government post in protest over the treatment of the women who were jailed. Who was she?

 

a. Annie J. Magee

b. Louise Parker Mayo

c. Doris Stevens

d. Anna Kelton Wiley

 

Links for Her Story: Jailed for Freedom

                            Time Magazine, April 16, 1928

                            Time Magazine, November 13, 1939 

 

 

 

Q63. What’s Her Story?

 

March 4 — On March 4, 1917, she was the first woman to be sworn in as a member of the US Congress, becoming the representative in the US House from Montana. She said she wanted "laws providing that women shall receive the same wages as men for equal amounts of work." She was a pacifist and a suffragist who worked for women's suffrage in Montana, which was granted in 1914. In Congress, when she voted against the US entering World War I, many said that was proof that women were unfit for politics. Carrie Chapman Catt said the vote against the war was not a sign of weakness, but that "She did her duty as her duty appeared to her. It was not for anyone else to make her decision for her." In 1918, she ran for the US Senate in Montana, but she was defeated. In 1940, she ran for the US House of Representatives again and won. She voted against the US declaring war after Pearl Harbor was attacked. In 1968, she led a demonstration in Washington, DC against the Vietnam War. She is the only woman to have served in the US Congress from Montana. Who was she?

 

a. May Arkwright Hutton

b. Hazel Hunkins

c. Alice Mary Robertson

d. Jeannette Rankin

 

Links for Her Story: The New York Times, November 12, 1916

Life Magazine, March 3, 1972

Activist for World Peace, Women's Rights, and Democratic Government

 

 

 

Q62. What’s Her Story?

 

March 3 — On March 3, 1913, on the eve of the presidential inauguration of Woodrow Wilson, she rode a white horse as the herald leading the Washington, DC suffrage parade organized by Alice Paul. The parade drew a larger crowd than the arrival of President Woodrow Wilson for the inauguration. On May 3, 1913, she was the parade herald again, for an even larger suffrage parade in New York City. She was a graduate of Vassar and the Law School of the University of New York, a labor lawyer, and one of the early members of the NAACP. In 1916, on a speaking tour for suffrage in the West, she collapsed from pernicious anemia, and died ten weeks later on November 25 at the age of thirty. She was called a martyr for suffrage. On December 25, a memorial service was held for her in Statuary Hall in the US Capitol. Statuary Hall had been used for the memorial services of Abraham Lincoln and other national figures. Who was she?

 

a. Anne Martin

b. Maud Younger

c. Inez Milholland Boissevain

d. Jane Addams

 

Links for Her Story: The New York Times, March 4, 1913

                             The New York Times, May 4, 1913

                             The New York Times, December 26, 1916

 

 

 

Q61. What’s Her Story?

 

March 2 — She worked with Susan B. Anthony to edit the fourth volume of The History of Woman Suffrage. In addition, she worked with Anthony to write her authorized biography. She also handled press relations for the International Congress of Women. When Mrs. Frank Leslie (Miriam Florence Leslie) left her estate to Carrie Chapman Catt, to be used for the cause of suffrage, Catt appointed her to head the Leslie Bureau of Suffrage Education. In that role, she wrote thousands of letters to newspaper editors to promote suffrage for woman. After the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified, she edited the fifth and sixth volumes of The History of Woman Suffrage. Who was she?

 

a. Julia Woodworth

b. Harriette H. Lee

c. Ida Husted Harper

d. Mildred Morris

 

Links for Her StoryThe History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV

                             The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V

                             The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume VI

                             The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, Volume I

                             The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, Volume II

                             The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, Volume III

 

 

 

Q60. What’s Her Story?

 

March 1 — She was born in Cicero, NY in 1826. Her father was a nationally-known abolitionist, and she grew up in a home that was a "station" on the "underground railroad". She became involved in the women's rights movement in 1852 when she spoke at the National Woman's Rights Convention in Syracuse, NY. Along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, she was a founding member of the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA). From 1875 - 1876, she was president of NWSA. She was a prolific writer for women's rights and worked with Stanton and Anthony to edit the first three volumes of The History of Woman Suffrage, which documented the suffrage movement in the US from 1848 to 1885. She also wrote Woman as Inventor which described some of the inventions created by women. Who was she?

 

a. Sara Bard Field

b. Matilda Joslyn Gage

c. Lethia C. Fleming

d. Frances Dana Gage

 

Links for Her Story: The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I

                             The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II

                             The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III                

                             Woman as Inventor

 

 

 

Q59. What’s Her Story?

 

February 28 — In 1917, just before the male voters in New York State were to cast their ballots regarding suffrage for women in that state, The New York Times published an editorial against women's right to vote. The Crisis, the magazine of the NAACP, included an editorial urging black male voters in New York to support women's suffrage. Because the state was so populous, when women's suffrage was passed in New York, the number of women in the US with full suffrage nearly doubled. Fifty-one years later, the voters in New York elected the first African-American congresswoman. In 1972, she became the first woman to run for the Democratic presidential nomination, receiving 152 votes on the first ballot at the Democratic National Convention. Her historic campaign inspired other women, such as Congresswoman Barbara Lee, to run for office. Who was she?

 

a. Shirley Chisholm

b. Carol Moseley Braun

c. Barbara Jordan

d. Yvonne Brathwaite Burke

 

Links for Her Story: The Crisis, November 1917

                             The New York Times, November 6, 1917

                             Unbought and Unbossed 

 

 

 

Q58. What’s Her Story?

 

February 27 — She was born on February 27, 1880 in Boston, MA to a bi-racial family. Her great aunts, Angelina and Sarah, were famous white abolitionists and suffragists earlier in the nineteenth century, and she was named after one of them. Her aunt Charlotte helped to found the National Association of Colored Women. Her father was a lawyer, the second black to graduate from Harvard Law School. She attended the Boston Normal School of Gymnastics, which became Wellesley College. After graduation, she moved to Washington, DC with her father and became a teacher. She was a close associate of Mary Church Terrell and a strong supporter of suffrage. She wrote essays, short stories, and poems which reflected her political views. She also wrote a three-act play for the NAACP, called Rachel, which focused on the issue of lynching. Who was she?

 

a. Sarah Forten

b. Sarah J. Smith Garnett

c. Angelina Weld Grimké

d. Sarah Tarelton Colvin

 

Link for Her StoryRachel

 

 

 

Q57. What’s Her Story?

 

February 26 — She was born in Raleigh, NC in 1858 to a mother who was a slave. After the Civil War, in 1868, she received a scholarship to Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute. In 1877, she married, but her husband died two years later. She graduated from Oberlin College in 1887 with a bachelor's and master's degree. She became a math and science teacher, and then principal at a high school in Washington, DC for prominent black families. In 1892, she wrote A Voice from the South, which was a collection of essays advocating for women's rights. She attended the World's Congress of Representative Women in 1893 and spoke at the Pan-African Congress Conference in London in 1900. She helped to found the Colored Women's YWCA in 1905. In 1925, she received a PhD from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Who was she?

 

a. Hallie Quinn Brown

b. Anna Julia Cooper

c. Charlotte Rollin

d. Rozie Harris

 

Link for Her Story: A Voice from the South

 

 

 

Q56. What’s Her Story?

 

February 25 — She was born in 1843 in Indiana. Because there were no schools for blacks in Indiana, her mother hired a private tutor. When she was twelve, she was allowed to attend a previously all-white school. She married in 1868 and moved to Chicago. She attended the first suffrage mass meeting in Chicago in 1869. She wrote many articles and lectured in favor of temperance and suffrage. In 1894, she was a speaker for the suffrage campaign in Kansas. During the fight for suffrage in California in 1896, she worked with Susan B. Anthony, Anna Howard Shaw, and Carrie Chapman Catt and was a frequent speaker. Who was she?

 

a. Naomi Bowman Talbert Anderson

b. Mary C. Bryon

c. Elizabeth Chase

d. Celia Gray

 

Links for Her Story: Noted Negro Women

                             The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV

 

 

 

Q55. What’s Her Story?

 

February 24 — Both mother and daughter were part of a family of abolitionists and suffragists. The mother was mentioned in the first volume of The History of Woman Suffrage, and mother and/or daughter were included in the next three volumes of the suffrage history. Both women were associates of Susan B. Anthony. The elder of the pair was born into a free black family in 1810 and was a founding member of the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society in 1833. She lectured frequently against segregation and for suffrage for women and blacks. Her husband, Robert, was a prominent speaker and known as the president of the "underground railroad". The younger member of the mother-daughter pair was born in 1839. She attended Eagleswood School, which was a co-educational, interracial school. She was active in the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) and the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). Who were they?

 

a. Charlotte Vandine Forten and Margaretta Forten

b. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Harriot Stanton Blatch

c. Lucy Stone and Alice Stone Blackwell

d. Harriet Forten Purvis and Harriet (Hattie) Purvis

 

Links for Her StoryThe History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I

                             The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II

                             The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III

                             The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV

 

 

 

Q54. What’s Her Story?

 

February 23 — She was born in Norfolk, Virginia in 1875. In 1889, she was the first black graduate of Spencerian College of Commerce in Philadelphia. She became the lady principal at State Normal and Agricultural College in Alabama in 1890. She married one of the leaders in the YMCA, and she became active in the YWCA. Beginning in 1911, she wrote a series of articles on women's club for The Crisis magazine published by the NAACP. She was an avid advocate of suffrage for women. During World War I, she served as a nurse in France. When the Southern states blocked black women from voting in 1920, after passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, she was part of a delegation of black women who appealed to Alice Paul to have the National Woman's Party (NWP) address the issue. But, the NWP refused. Who was she?

 

a. Anna H. Jones

b. Lillian A. Turner

c. Addie Waites Hunton

d. Mary Fitzbutler Waring

 

Links for Her Story"Women's Clubs", The Crisis, May 1911

                                    "Women's Clubs", The Crisis, September 1911

                                    "Women's Clubs", The Crisis, October 1911

                                    "Women's Clubs", The Crisis, July 1912

                                    "The National Woman's Party", The Crisis, May 1921

                                    Two Colored Women with the American Expeditionary Forces

 

 

 

Q53. What’s Her Story?

 

February 22 — She graduated from Storer College in West Virginia in 1880 and became a public school teacher. She moved to Washington, DC to run a home for women and children. She became a professor of English at Howard University and was a well-known suffragist. She was one of the speakers at Susan. B. Anthony's eightieth birthday celebration at the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) convention. While lecturing on suffrage, she was hosted in Anthony's home. In 1914, she was appointed to the Board of Education in Washington, DC. In 1915, at the "Votes for Women" Symposium in Washington, DC, she advocated for votes for mothers. She was active in the NAACP and eventually became an editor for The Crisis, a publication of the NAACP. Who was she?

 

a. Nellie Griswold Francis

b. Coralie Franklin Cook

c. Carrie Horton

d. Mary D. Randolph

 

Links for Her StoryThe History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV

                             The New York Times, December 13, 1912

                             "An Educator", The Crisis, July 1914

                             "Votes for Mothers", The Crisis, August 1915 

 

 

Q52. What’s Her Story?

 

February 21 — She was born into a prominent African-American family in Philadelphia, PA in 1855. She worked for several years as a teacher before becoming a journalist in the early 1870's. Her articles were published in black newspapers, including The Indianapolis Freeman and Woman's Era, as well as white newspapers and magazines, such as The Ladies Home Journal and The Philadelphia Inquirer. She edited the first regular woman's column, called "The Woman's Department", in a black newspaper, the New York Freeman. In 1893, she married a prominent physician in Philadelphia. In 1908, she wrote the book, The Work of Afro-American Women, which documented the contributions of other black women. In 1914, she was appointed by the Pennsylvania Suffrage Association to be a speaker on the suffrage campaign in that state. Who was she?

 

a. Mrs. N. F. (Gertrude Bustill) Mossell

b. Caroline Remond Putnam

c. Mary E. Jackson

d. Verina Morton Harris Jones

 

Links for Her Story: The Work of Afro-American Women

                             Noted Negro Women

 

 

 

Q51. What’s Her Story?

 

February 20 — At the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) convention in 1899, she proposed a resolution to have NAWSA address the issue of Jim Crow laws which required black women to ride in smoking railcars, instead of the more suitable railcars in which white women traveled. After a lot of debate about the resolution, Susan B. Anthony felt this issue was beyond the scope of women's suffrage, and the resolution was tabled. As a result, this woman was the only delegate who did not support the re-election of Susan B. Anthony as president of NAWSA. Who was she?

 

a. Lottie Wilson Jackson

b. Eliza A. Spencer

c. Mary Fitzbutler Waring

d. Celia Gray

 

Link for Her Story: History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV

 

 

 

Q50. What’s Her Story?

 

February 19 — She was the third wife of Booker T. Washington and the Lady Principal of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute. In the late 1890's, she was vice president of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW). At the time, NACW had 8,000 members in 125 branches from twenty-six states. On behalf of NACW, she responded to a call from Susan B. Anthony to submit a statement to be published in the fourth volume of the History of Woman Suffrage. Her statement focused on the issues that concerned black women: "Jim Crow" laws, lynchings, and the convict lease system, whereby prisoners in the South were leased to work for private companies. She became president of NACW in 1912. Who was she?

 

a. Margaret Murray Washington

b. Fannie Smith Washington

c. Olivia Davidson Washington

d. Martha Dandridge Custis Washington

 

Links for Her Story: Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction 

                             History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV

                            

 

 

Q49. What’s Her Story?

 

February 18 — She was of African-American and Native-American descent, born in 1831 in New York. She began her teaching career at the age of fourteen. In 1863, she was the first African-American woman to become a principal in the New York City schools. In the late 1880's, she organized the Equal Suffrage League in Brooklyn, NY to advocate for women's suffrage. She later became superintendant of the Suffrage Department of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW). On behalf of NACW, she attended the first Universal Races Congress in London. Dr. WEB DuBois was among the many people who greeted her on her return to the US. Who was she?

 

a. Sarrah A. Jones

b. Elizabeth L. Davis

c. Sarah J. Smith Garnett

d. S. Willie Layton

 

Links for Her Story"Women's Clubs", The Crisis, October 1911

                             Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction

 

 

 

Q48. What’s Her Story?

 

February 17 — She was born in 1866 to free black parents in Charleston, SC. She graduated from Charleston's Avery Normal Institute public school. She moved to New Jersey in 1885 and set up a dressmaking business. From an early age she had been active in the Methodist Episcopal Church, so she started to teach Sunday school at the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Zion church in Jersey City. In 1897, she was given a license to preach. She was ordained an elder in the church in 1903. In 1915, she organized the State Federation of Colored Women's Clubs in New Jersey and became a member of the New Jersey State Board of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) in 1917. She served as pastor of the Wallace Chapel AME Zion Church in Summit, New Jersey from 1925 -1946. Who was she?

 

a. Rev. Anna Howard Shaw

b. Rev. Olympia Brown

c. Rev. Florence Spearing Randolph

d. Rev. Alice Ball Loomis

 

Links for Her Story: History of Woman Suffrage, Volume VI

                             New Jersey Women's History

 

 

 

Q47. What’s Her Story?

 

February 16 — She was born in Orange, VA in 1879 to parents who had been slaves. Her father was a preacher, and her mother was a cook. She graduated from the Colored High School in Washington, DC. In 1896, she helped to create the National Association of Colored Women (NACW). In 1900, at the National Baptist Convention, she gave the speech, “How the Sisters Are Hindered from Helping”, which won her wide acclaim. This led to the formation of the Woman’s Convention (WC), an auxiliary to the National Baptist Convention (NBC). She founded the National Training School for Women and Girls, which blended industrial training, a liberal arts education, and religious instruction. In the 1915 article, "Black Women and Reform", for The Crisis magazine of the NAACP, she argued for the right to vote for black women. In 1920, she became president of the National League of Republican Colored Women in the District of Columbia. When Herbert Hoover was elected president in 1928, he chose her to lead a fact-finding commission on housing. Who was she?

 

a. Caroline Burnett

b. Nannie Helen Burroughs

c. Helen N. Bates

d. Mary V. Berry

 

Links for Her Story: Her Papers

                            "Black Women and Reform", The Crisis, August 1915

 

 

 

Q46. What’s Her Story?

 

February 15 — Susan B. Anthony was born on February 15, 1820. On February 15, 1907, at its annual convention, the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) commemorated Susan B. Anthony, who founded NAWSA in 1890 and died shortly after attending the NAWSA convention in 1906. At the commemoration ceremony, she spoke on behalf of black women, who were often excluded from NAWSA. She was the first black graduate of Brockport Normal School, a teachers college in New York State. She was a teacher and a leader in the black community, and an associate of both Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington. She first won wide recognition when she gave a speech titled "The Intellectual Progress of the Colored Women of the United States Since the Emancipation Proclamation" at the Chicago Columbian Exposition of 1893. She wrote a history of the club movement for black women, which was first published in 1902. Who was she?

 

a. Ora Brown Stokes

b. Frances (Fannie) Barrier Williams

c. Maud Jamison

d. Eliza A. Spencer

 

Links for Her Story"The Intellectual Progress of the Colored Women"

                             Club Movement Among Negro Women                      
                             The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V

 

 

 

Q45. What’s Her Story?

 

February 14 — She was born in Oberlin, OH in 1866 and graduated from Oberlin College in 1886. She became an assistant principal of the Union High School in Little Rock, AR in 1887. She married in 1891 and moved to Buffalo, NY. She founded the first club in Buffalo to affiliate with the National Association of Colored Women (NACW) and later became president of NACW. In 1905, she helped to found the Niagara Movement, which was a precursor to the NAACP. She was one of the early members of the NAACP and became a vice president of that organization. In 1915, she gave a speech titled "Women and Colored Women" at the "Votes for Women: A Symposium by Leading Thinkers of Colored Women" in Washington, DC. Who was she?

 

a. Mary Eleanora McCoy

b. Daisy Elizabeth Adams Lampkin

c. Alice Woodby McKane

d. Mary Burnett Talbert

 

Links for Her Story: "Women and Colored Women", The Crisis, August 1915

                             Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction

  

 

 

Q44. What’s Her Story?

 

February 13 — She graduated from Oberlin College in Ohio in 1884. She taught at Wilberforce College, an historically black college in Ohio, and later became the first black woman appointed to a Board of Education. In 1896, she became the first president of the National Association of Colored Women. Two years later, Susan B. Anthony asked her to speak at the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) convention. At the NAWSA convention in 1900, she gave a keynote speech on "The Justice of Woman Suffrage". In 1904, she spoke at the International Congress of Women in Berlin, Germany. She was the only black woman in attendance. She gave her speech in German, and then in French and English. Ida Husted Harper reported in The Washington Post that the speech was "the hit of the congress". She was a friend of Frederick Douglass, and her husband was a Harvard-graduate and a judge in Washington, DC. In 1909, she became a charter member of the NAACP. She joined the National Woman's Party and picketed the White House several times. She was named one of the one hundred outstanding alumni of Oberlin College in 1933. In the early 1950's, she led the fight to desegregate eating establishments in Washington, DC. Who was she?

 

a. Rozie Harris

b. Helen Pitts

c. Mary Church Terrell

d. Mary Eleanora McCoy

 

Links for Her Story: A Colored Woman in a White World

                            The Progress of Colored Women

                            "The Justice of Woman Suffrage", The Crisis, September 1912

                            "Suffrage Workers", The Crisis, September 1912

 

 

 

Q43. What’s Her Story?

 

February 12 — In 1884, she was ordered by the conductor of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad Company to give up her seat on the train and move to the smoking or "Jim Crow" car. She refused and was forcibly removed from the all-white railroad car. She sued the railroad and won! But on appeal, the victory was overturned. She was a teacher, a journalist, and a prominent public speaker who became well-known for her anti-lynching campaign. While she was lecturing in Rochester, NY, Susan B. Anthony invited to her to stay in her home. When Anthony learned that her stenographer refused to take dictation from this black woman, Anthony fired the stenographer on the spot. After there were race riots against blacks in Illinois in 1908, she was one of only two black women asked to sign a call to action, which resulted in the formation of the NAACP. The "call" was released on February 12, 1909, the one-hundredth anniversary of the birth of President Lincoln. In 1913, she famously refused to march at the end of the suffrage parade organized by Alice Paul in Washington, DC. Instead, she marched with the rest of the delegation from her state of Illinois. She formed the Alpha Suffrage Club in Chicago to encourage black women to vote after women won partial suffrage in Illinois in 1913. Who was she?

 

a. Mary C. Bryon

b. Vera Wesley Green

c. Viola Hill

d. Ida B. Wells

 

Links for Her Story: The Writings of ...

                             "Suffrage Paraders", The Crisis, April 1913

 

 

 

Q42. What’s Her Story?

 

February 11 — She was born in 1856 in Cambridge, MA and educated in Cambridge schools. She became a teacher, and in 1899, became the principal of the Grammar School of Cambridge. In 1916, she became school master at the Agassia School in Cambridge, responsible for twelve teachers and five hundred white students, the only African-American in New England to hold such a position. She lectured on various subjects including women's suffrage. She was active in many organizations including the NAACP. Women had been allowed to vote in school board elections in Massachusetts since 1879, and in 1915, she wrote an article called "Votes for Teachers" for The Crisis magazine of the NAACP. Who was she?

 

a. Maria L. Baldwin

b. Frances Rollin Whipper

c. Sylvanie Williams

d. Frankie J. Pierce

  

Links for Her Story: "Votes for Teachers", The Crisis, August 1915

                             Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction  

 

 

Q41. What’s Her Story?

 

February 10 — She was born in 1842 in Boston, MA and educated in Massachusetts and New York. In 1858, she married the first African-American to graduate from Harvard Law School. During the Civil War, she and her husband recruited black soldiers to fight for the Union. In 1875, she began working with the Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association, an affiliate of the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) formed by Julia Ward Howe and Lucy Stone. In 1894, with the help of her daughter, Florida Ridley, and Maria Baldwin, a Boston school principal, she organized The Woman's Era Club, an advocacy group for black women. She became the editor and publisher for The Woman’s Era, the first newspaper published by and for African-American women. In 1896, she worked with Mary Church Terrell to form the National Association of Colored Women (NACW) and became one of its vice presidents. She was also one of the charter members of the NAACP. Who was she?

 

a. Amelia Shadd

b. Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin

c. Jane Lawson

d. Viola Hill

 

Links for Her Story: The Woman's Era, Volume I

                             The Woman's Era, Volume II

                             The Woman's Era, Volume III

                             "Trust the Women", The Crisis, August 1915

                             Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction

 

 

 

Q40. What’s Her Story?

 

February 9 — She was born in Sparta, GA to a black woman and a white farmer in 1863, during the Civil War. Her father did not live with her, but he helped to pay for her education at Sparta's Bass Academy and at Atlanta University. She taught at the American Missionary School and the Tuskegee Institute. She married a fellow teacher in 1888 and had nine children. She was a strong supporter of women's suffrage and promoted suffrage at the Tuskegee Woman's Club. She also lectured at meetings of the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs. She expressed concerns about the Southern states disenfranchising black men and blocking the right to vote for women. In 1901, she was the only life member of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) from Alabama. In 1912, she wrote the article ""Colored Women as Voters" for The Crisis magazine of the NAACP. Who was she?

 

a. Mary V. Berry

b. Sadie L. Adams

c. Adella Hunt Logan

d. Virginia Arnold

  

Links for Her Story: "Colored Women as Voters", The Crisis, September 1912

                                 History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV

  

 

 

Q39. What’s Her Story?

 

February 8 — She was born a slave in 1837 in Washington, DC, but her aunt bought her freedom. As a teen, she worked as a domestic servant, using her salary to hire a private tutor. She ultimately graduated from Oberlin College in 1865. She became a teacher, and from 1869 to 1902, served as the principal of the Institute of Colored Youth, which later became Cheyney University. She was a pioneer in the industrial arts and teacher education. In addition to teaching, she served as president of the Women's Home and Foreign Missionary Society of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church. She also wrote a regular column on women’s rights for a Philadelphia newspaper. In 1881, she married a bishop in the AME church. In 1896, she helped to found the National Association of Colored Woman (NACW). She went with her husband on a mission to Cape Town, South Africa in 1902, where she taught women about temperance. Who was she?

 

a. Bertha G. Higgins

b. Frances (Fanny) Jackson Coppin

c. Elizabeth Piper Ensley

d. N. F. (Gertrude Bustill) Mossell

 

Link for Her Story: Reminiscences of School Life, and Hints on Teaching

 

 

 

Q38. What’s Her Story?

 

February 7 — She was born in 1837 to prominent, black parents in Philadelphia. She was sent to the Higginson Grammar School in Salem, MA and the Salem Normal School. She became a member of the Salem Female Anti-Slavery Society. She also started to attend women's suffrage meetings and met with prominent suffrage leaders including Frederick Douglass, Lucretia Mott, and Susan B. Anthony. She wrote poetry which reflected her political views. In 1878, at the age of 41, she married a Presbyterian minister. She gave birth to a daughter who died in infancy. After that, she organized a women's missionary group for her husband's church. In 1896, she became a founding member of the National Association of Colored Women. Who was she?

 

a. Sarah Mapps Douglass

b. Mary A. McCurdy

c. Daisy Elizabeth Adams Lampkin

d. Charlotte Forten Grimké

 

Link for Her Story: The Journals of ...

  

 

 

Q37. What’s Her Story?

 

February 6 — She was born in 1826 in Salem, MA. In 1835, she passed the entrance exam to Salem High School, but was not allowed to attend the all-white school. Her family moved to Newport, RI where she attended a private school for blacks. Her family returned to Salem in 1841 after he father was able to end the school segregation. Her brother was a famous anti-slavery lecturer. In 1853, she was injured when she was forcibly removed, because of her race, from an opera performance in Boston. She sued for damages and won. Like her brother, she became an anti-slavery lecturer. The brother and sister team participated in a lecture tour with Susan B. Anthony. In 1858, both she and her brother spoke at the ninth National Woman's Rights Convention. In 1859, she emigrated to Europe and lectured against slavery. In 1864, she wrote The Negroes and Anglo-Africans as Freedmen and Soldiers. She married a European and died in Italy in 1894. Who was she?

 

a. Julia Dorsey

b. Celia Gray

c. Sarah Parker Remond

d. Grace Campbell

 

Link for Her Story: The Negroes and Anglo-Africans as Freedmen and Soldiers

  

 

 

Q36. What’s Her Story?

 

February 5 — She was born in 1825 in Baltimore, MD to free African-American parents. She went to the Academy for Negro Youth, run by her uncle, Rev. William Watkins. At the age of twenty, her first volume of poems was published. Following the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law in 1850, she fled Baltimore and moved to Ohio where she worked as a teacher at the Union Seminary. In 1853, she began a tour lecturing against slavery. In 1859, her short story "The Two Offers" was published, the first short story by an African-American to be published. She was a strong supporter of suffrage for women and worked directly with Susan B. Anthony. In 1866, she gave a major speech at the National Woman Suffrage Convention. She subsequently became active in the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA). Later, she served as vice president of the National Association of Colored Women. Like Ida B. Wells, she lectured and wrote against lynching. Who was she?

 

a. Annie Simms Banks

b. Harriet Beecher Stowe

c. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper

d. Christia Adair

 

Links for Her Story: The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II

                             Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted

                             Complete Poems

  

 

 

Q35. What’s Her Story?

 

February 4 — She was born in Wilmington, DE in 1823 to free black parents.  When she was ten, in 1833, her family moved to West Chester, PA, so the children could go to a Quaker-run school. When the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 threatened to force into bondage both free-born blacks and escaped slaves, she moved to Canada. She opposed all forms of segregation and opened an integrated school in Canada. She wrote extensively and published her own newspaper. She also published A Voice from Harper’s Ferry, by Osborne Anderson. She returned to the US in 1861, as a young widow with two small children. In 1869, she was the first African-American woman to enroll in law courses at Howard University. She studied law at night, while working during the day as a teacher and writing for the New National Era, a newspaper published by Frederick Douglass. She joined the National Woman Suffrage Association and testified for women's suffrage before the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives. In 1883, she was awarded her law degree from Howard Law School. She was the second African-American woman to become a lawyer. Who was she?

 

a. Mary Ann Shadd Cary

b. Frances E. Willard

c. Alice Scott

d. Nell Mercer

 

Links for Her Story: A Plea for Emigration

                             Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction

  

 

 

Q34. What’s Her Story?

 

February 3 — She was born around 1850 to parents who were formerly slaves. She graduated from Wilberforce University in Ohio with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1873. After graduation, she taught school in Mississippi and South Carolina. In 1885, she became dean of Allen University in South Carolina, and in 1892, she became principal of Tuskegee Institute. The following year, she became a professor at Wilberforce University. She often traveled domestically and abroad giving lectures on temperance, women's suffrage, and rights for African-Americans. In 1899, she represented the US at the International Congress of Women in London. From 1905 to 1912, she was president of the Ohio State Federation of Colored Women's Clubs. In 1920, she became president of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW), and in that role, spoke at the Republican National Convention in 1924. In 1926, she wrote the book Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction to document the contributions of other African-American women. Who was she?

 

a. Hallie Quinn Brown

b. Mary McLeod Bethune

c. Caroline Chase

d. Laura Beasley

 

Link for Her Story: Homespun Heroines and Other Women of Distinction

 

 

 

Q33. What’s Her Story?

 

February 2 — She was born Araminta Ross around 1820, but later took her husband's last name and her mother's first name. In 1849, she escaped from slavery in Maryland and traveled to Philadelphia. In 1850, she returned to Maryland to rescue her sister and her sister's children. She then helped her brother and two other men to escape slavery. She continued to travel by night helping others flee from their slave masters. In 1860, she was able to rescue her elderly parents. Given the number slaves she led to freedom via the "underground railroad", she became known as "The Moses of Her People". During the Civil War, she worked as a spy for the Union army and guided a raid, which freed more than seven hundred people from slavery. After the war, she began campaigning for women's suffrage and spoke at women's right's meetings. In 1896, she spoke at the convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). Who was she?

 

a. Ruth Remond

b. Harriet Tubman

c. Belle Squire

d. Maggie Walker

 

Links for Her Story:  The Moses of Her People

                              Scenes in the Life of ...

                              History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV

 

 

 

Q32. What’s Her Story?

 

February 1 — Her given name was Isabella Baumfree (or Bomefree), but she is better known by the name she assumed later in life. She was born into slavery around 1797 in a Dutch settlement in New York State. She spoke only Dutch until she was about nine years old and continued to speak with a Dutch accent throughout her life. In 1817, she was forced to marry another slave who fathered several children with her. In 1826, she fled with her infant daughter from her slave masters, but she had to leave her other children behind. After slaves were freed in New York, she learned that her five-year-old son had been sold illegally to a slave owner in Alabama. With the help of Quaker activists, she took the slave owner to court and won her son's return. She was the first black woman to win a court case against a white man. In 1843, she became a travelling preacher. At the 1851 Ohio Woman's Rights Convention, she gave her now-famous "A'n't I a Woman" speech, in which she countered the argument that men protected women, and therefore, women did not need equal rights. In 2009, she became the first black woman to be honored with a statue in the US Capitol Building. Who was she?

 

a. Nancy Prince

b. Harriette H. Lee

c. Nell Mercer

d. Sojourner Truth

 

Links for Her Story: Reminiscences of Frances D. Gage                            

                             A Bonds Woman of Olden Time

                             The New York Times Political Blog, April 28, 2009

           

 

 

Q31. What’s Her Story?

 

January 31 — She was born in 1853 in Ravena, OH. Her family moved to Warren, OH in 1862, where she finished her schooling. When her widowed father was sent to Congress in 1880, she moved with him to Washington, DC, where she met her future husband. Beginning in 1890, she devoted herself to the suffrage movement and began working with Susan B. Anthony. She was treasurer of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) for 15 years and president of the Ohio Woman Suffrage Association for 18 years. In 1903, the headquarters for NAWSA was moved to Warren, OH, under her direction. She was the first woman to become vice chair of the National Republican Executive Committee. And, she wrote numerous books about the history of Ohio. Who was she?

 

a. Harriet Taylor Upton

b. Laura Clay

c. Rachel Foster Avery

d. Catharine Waugh McCulloch

 

Links for Her Story: History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V

                             History of the Western Reserve, Volume I

                             History of the Western Reserve, Volume II

                             Our Early Presidents: Their Wives and Children

            

 

 

Q30. What’s Her Story?

 

January 30 — She was born in 1842 in St. Louis, MO. During the Civil War, her mother was the Sanitary Commissioner in charge of the hospitals in St. Louis. Her father was Chief of Police and Provost Marshal. She was a delegate to the American Equal Rights Association convention held in St. Louis in October 1869, and there she met Susan B. Anthony. In 1871, she graduated with honors from Washington University with a law degree. She was one of the first women to graduate law school and become a practicing lawyer in the US. Later, she was the first woman to become a US Marshal. She worked closely with Susan B. Anthony and was a strong supporter of women's suffrage for much of her life. She died in 1913. Who was she?

 

a. Arabella Mansfield

b. Ada H. Kepley

c. Myra Bradwell

d. Phoebe Couzins

 

Links for Her Story: The New York Times, December 7, 1913

                             History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III

 

 

 

Q29. What’s Her Story?

 

January 29 — She was born in 1842 in Philadelphia, PA to parents who were abolitionists. When she was only fourteen, she wrote an emotional, anti-slavery essay, which was published in The Liberator, a newspaper run by William Lloyd Garrison. While still in her teens, she gave a speech at the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society. During the Civil War, she campaigned for anti-slavery Republicans and helped them win at the polls. In 1864, she became the first woman to speak before the US House of Representatives. Along with Frederick Douglass and Theodore Tilton, she proposed the Fifteenth Amendment to give former slaves the right to vote. Unfortunately, when the amendment was passed by the US Congress, it did not include the right to vote for women. But, she continued to work for suffrage for women. Who was she?

 

a. Mamie Shields Pyle

b. Margaret Rees

c. Anna Dickinson

d. Rowena P. B. Tingley

 

Links for Her Story: A Paying Investment

                             History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II

  

 

 

Q28. What’s Her Story?

 

January 28 — She was born in Illinois in 1834. When she was seventeen, her family moved to Oregon where she began teaching school. She married, had four children, and began writing novels in the evening. In 1871, after the family moved to Portland, OR, she started working for equal rights for women. She founded a newspaper, called the New Northwest, and lectured on temperance and women's rights to support the family. In 1884, she became a vice president in the National Women's Suffrage Association. She led the successful suffrage campaign in Idaho in 1896. And, in 1910, she led the fight for women's suffrage in Washington State. After suffrage referendums were defeated in Oregon five times, in 1912, she was victorious in winning suffrage for women in Oregon. She was given the honor of signing Oregon's suffrage proclamation and became the first woman in Oregon to register to vote. Who was she?

 

a. Viola M. Coe

b. May Arkwright Hutton

c. Emma Smith DeVoe

d. Abigail Scott Duniway

 

Links for Her Story:

An Autobiographical History of the Equal Suffrage Movement in Pacific Coast States

American Women: Fifteen Hundred Biographies, Volume I

  

 

 

Q27. What’s Her Story?

 

January 27 — She was born in Massachusetts in 1828. After her father died, her mother joined the Mormon church. By the time she turned fifteen years old, she had married into a prominent Mormon family and had become a school teacher. She and her husband moved with their infant son to Illinois, but shortly after that, her husband abandoned her. She remarried, but her husband died suddenly in 1850. She moved with other Mormon settlers to Utah and began teaching school in Salt Lake City. She was instrumental in gaining suffrage for women in the Utah territory in 1870. Utah was the second territory, after Wyoming, to grant women the right to vote. In 1876, she became an editor of the women's rights newspaper, the Woman's Exponent. When the US Congress revoked suffrage for women in the Utah territory in 1877, the readers of her newspaper protested strongly. By the time Utah became a state in 1896, women had won full suffrage. Who was she?

 

a. Margaret Oakes

b. Camilla Whitcomb

c. Emmeline Blanch Wells

d. Julia Woodworth

 

Links for Her Story: Woman's Exponent

                             History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV

  

 

 

Q26. What’s Her Story?

 

January 26 — She was born in 1814 in upstate New York. She joined the abolitionist movement when she learned of the unjust treatment of women under slavery. She moved to Illinois and met her future husband. In 1869, the couple moved to South Pass City, WY. She lobbied the legislature of the territory of Wyoming to give women the right to vote. Wyoming became the first territory to grant women full suffrage in 1869, and when Wyoming became a state in 1890, it was the first state with full suffrage for women. In 1870, she was appointed justice of the peace in South Pass City. She was the first woman to become a court justice. Who was she?

 

a. Esther Hobart Morris

b. Julia Bright

c. Theodora W. Youmans

d. Eliza A. Swain

 

Links for Her Story: History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III

                                    American Women: Fifteen Hundred Biographies, Volume II

  

 

 

Q25. What’s Her Story?

 

January 25 — She was born on January 25, 1871 in Boston, MA. She graduated from Radcliffe College in Cambridge, MA in 1898. When she attended the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) convention in 1900, she discovered that there were very few young women. She founded the College Equal Suffrage League to increase interest about suffrage on college campuses. In 1916, she became head of the Congressional Committee of NAWSA. She wrote a book titled The Front Door Lobby, which was the half-humorous name given to the Congressional Committee of NAWSA by one of the press-gallery men in Washington because the women lobbying for suffrage never used backstairs methods. In February 1920, she became the chair of the new National League of Women Voters, which was formed in anticipation of the ratification of the Federal Woman Suffrage Amendment. After women across the US won the right to vote, she organized the Women’s Joint Congressional Committee, an organization that lobbied for legislation of importance to women. Who was she?

 

a. Maud Wood Park

b. Mamie Shields Pyle

c. Jeannette Rankin

d. Amelia Shadd

 

Links for Her Story: Front Door Lobby

                      The New York Times, February 19, 1920

 

 

 

Q24. What’s Her Story?

 

January 24 — She was born in 1813 in Bloomfield, NY. She married in 1833, but her husband passed away in 1845. After his death, she studied medicine and gave lectures on anatomy and physiology to women. In 1849, she remarried. In 1850, she helped to organize and served as the president of the first National Woman's Rights Convention in Worcester, MA. The convention included representatives from nine states. After the success of the first national convention, she organized a second convention for the following year. Beginning in 1853, she edited the women's newspaper, The Una. In 1870, she organized another national woman's rights convention to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the first. In 1871, she published the proceedings in The History of the National Woman's Rights Movement. Who was she?

 

a. Helen Mar Jackson Gougar

b. Mary Coffin Ware Dennett

c. Paulina Wright Davis

d. Louisine Waldron Elder Havemeyer

  

Link for Her Story: A History of the National Woman's Rights Movement

 

  

 

Q23. What’s Her Story?

 

January 23 — She was born in Ohio in 1808. Her husband was an abolitionist lawyer, and she was active in the abolition, temperance, and women's rights movements. With her husband, she raised eight children. In 1851, she organized a women's rights convention in Akron, Ohio, where Sojourner Truth gave her most famous speech. She was a traveling lecturer and a prolific writer. She was also known as "Aunt Fanny", the author of children's books and poetry. During the Civil War, she was in charge of a refuge for freed slaves. It was then that she met Clara Barton, who was working nearby providing medical aid. Who was she?

 

a. Frances M. Abbott

b. Frances W. Munds

c. Frances Barrier Williams

d. Frances Dana Gage

  

Links for Her Story: History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I

                                    History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II

 

 

 

Q22. What’s Her Story?

 

January 22 — She was born in Cambridge, MA in 1810 and educated by her father, since schooling for girls was limited. She was an early advocate for political rights for women. In 1840, she became the editor of the newspaper, The Dial, and in 1844, started writing for the New York Tribune. In 1845, she wrote the book, Woman in the Nineteenth Century. This work was the first major American feminist book and inspired many other women, including Susan B. Anthony. She was sent to Europe by the New York Tribune as its first female correspondent. While there, she met Giovanni Ossoli, and they had a child together. She died in 1850 in a shipwreck near New York City. After her death, her memoirs where published by her fellow writers: Ralph Waldo Emerson, William Henry Channing, and J. F. Clarke. Who was she?

 

a. Mabel Connor

b. Anna Elizabeth Dickinson

c. Margaret Fuller

d. Kate M. Gordon

  

Links for Her Story: Woman in the Nineteenth Century

                             At Home and Abroad

                             Her Memoirs, Volume I

                             Her Memoirs, Volume II

 

 

 

Q21. What’s Her Story?

 

January 21 — She was born on January 21, 1853 in Winchester, VA. She was educated in private schools and studied biology at Columbia University. Although her given name was Alice Chenoweth, she started to write and lecture under another name, which she ultimately adopted legally. She wrote magazine articles, short stories, and books on a variety of subjects counter to the cultural norms of the time. Many of her magazine articles and short stories have been consolidated in the book, Facts and Fictions of Life, including her famous article "Sex in Brain", in which she disputed the notion that women's brains were inferior to the brains of men. She was a vice president in the National American Woman Suffrage Association who knew how to get things done in Washington, DC. The New York Times called her the "Diplomat of the Suffrage Service". In 1920, President Wilson appointed her to the US Civil Service Commission, the highest position in the federal government to date for a woman. Who was she?

 

a. Helen Hamilton Gardener

b. Alice M. Cosu

c. Alice Gram

d. Alice Kimball

 

Links for Her Story: The New York Times, June 15, 1919

                             Facts and Fictions of Life

                             Memorial - Biography

                             History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V

           

 

 

Q20. What’s Her Story?

 

January 20 — She was born on January 20, 1856 in Seneca Falls, NY to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and she became a suffragist in her own right. She attended Vassar College and earned a bachelor's degree in Mathematics in 1878. She lived in England with husband for twenty years. While in England, she created a statistical study of rural English women's working conditions, for which she earned her master's degree from Vassar. When she returned to the US in 1902, she focused on the conditions for working women in the US. She formed the Woman's Political Union which merged in 1916 with the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage formed by Alice Paul and Lucy Burns. During World War I, she headed the Women's Land Army which organized women to provide farm labor while the men were away at war. Teddy Roosevelt wrote the introduction to her book, Mobilizing Woman-Power, which detailed the role of women during World War I. Who was she?

 

a. Margaret Livingston Stanton Lawrence

b. Harriot Stanton Blatch

c. Margaret Livingston Cady

d. Catherine Cady

 

Links for Her Story: Mobilizing Woman-Power

                             A Woman's Point of View: Some Roads to Peace

 

 

 

Q19. What’s Her Story?

 

January 19 — She was born in 1839 near Rochester, NY and in 1857 moved to Evanston, IL to attend North Western Female College. In 1871, she became president of Evanston College for Ladies. When the college merged with Northwestern University, she became the first Dean of Women of the Women’s College. In 1874, she helped to form the Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) and became the corresponding secretary. She was elected president of the WCTU in 1879. Because male drunkenness often resulted in domestic violence, she believed women should have the right to vote in order to establish legal protections for themselves and their homes. The "home protection" argument resonated with many women. She was the first woman to be honored with a statue in Statuary Hall of the US Capitol Building. Who was she?

 

a. Esther Hobart Morris

b. Sakakawea

c. Sojourner Truth

d. Frances E. Willard

 

Links for Her Story: Address at the Woman's National Council of the United States

Glimpses of Fifty Years: the Autobiography of an American Woman

A Memorial Volume

 

 

 

Q18. What’s Her Story?

 

January 18 — She was born in 1819 and is best known for writing the words to the Battle Hymn of the Republic. She also started the celebration of Mother's Day. And, when the New England Woman Suffrage Association issued a call in August 1869 to form a national woman's suffrage organization, she was one of the signatories. As a result, the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) was formed in November 1869. Unlike the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA), formed by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, men were allowed to be members and officers in AWSA. NWSA and AWSA were combined in 1890 to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). Who was she? 

 

a. Elizabeth Chase

b. Julia Ward Howe

c. Caroline Maria Seymour Severance

d. Florence Howe Hall

 

Links for Her Story: Reminiscences, 1819-1899

                            The Woman Suffrage Movement

 

 

 

Q17. What’s Her Story?

 

January 17 — She was born on January 17, 1853 in Mobile, AL, but the family moved to New York City in 1857. For a while, she lived in Paris with her mother and attended boarding school there. In 1875, she married the wealthy Cornelius Vanderbilt and the couple had three children. In 1895, she shocked society by divorcing her husband and then remarrying within a year. In 1909, she joined the National American Women's Suffrage Association (NAWSA) and attended the International Women's Suffrage Association meeting in London. She donated large sums of money to the women's suffrage movement in the US and England. She formed the Political Equality League to gain political support for women's suffrage in New York City. After Alice Paul founded the Congressional Union in 1913, she merged the Political Equality League with Paul's organization, which later became the National Woman's Party. In 1915, she wrote a musical about suffrage that was performed in New York called, Melinda and Her Sisters. Who was she?

 

a. Crystal Eastman

b. Belva Ann Lockwood

c. Alva Erskine Belmont

d. Miriam Florence Leslie

 

Links for Her Story: Melinda and Her Sisters

                      The Story of the Woman's Party

 

 

 

Q16. What’s Her Story?

 

January 16 — She was born In Newcastle, England in 1847. In 1851, her family moved to Massachusetts, and then moved in 1859 to a log cabin in Michigan. She decided to pursue a religious vocation after she heard the Universalist woman minister, the Reverend Marianna Thompson, preach. She graduated from the Boston University School of Theology in 1876 and in 1880 became the first woman ordained by the Methodist Protestant Church. She graduated from Boston Medical School with a MD degree in 1885. While she was in medical school, she lectured for the Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association, where Lucy Stone was president. Beginning in 1885, she began to lecture full-time for suffrage and temperance. She soon began working with Susan B. Anthony, who convinced her to focus exclusively on suffrage. From 1904 - 1915, she was president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). During World War I, she led NAWSA's wartime work, and became one of the first women to earn the Distinguished Service Medal. She died on July 2, 1919, shortly after the US Congress sent the Federal Woman Suffrage Amendment to the states for ratification. Who was she? 

 

a. Anna Garlin Spencer

b. Mary F. Eastman

c. Anna Howard Shaw

d. Mary A. Livermore

 

Links for Her Story: The Story of a Pioneer

                            The New York Times, July 3, 1919

 

 

 

Q15. What’s Her Story?

 

January 15 — In 1839, she became the first woman to receive a college degree in Massachusetts. In 1850, she helped plan the National Woman's Rights Convention in Worcester, MA, and in 1852 while visiting Elizabeth Cady Stanton, she met Susan B. Anthony. She became a successful orator campaigning against slavery and for women's rights. In 1855, she married Henry Blackwell, a leading abolitionist. After the Civil War, she helped form the American Equal Rights Association (AERA), which advocated for equal voting rights regardless of gender or race. When the Fifteenth Amendment gave voting rights to black men, but not women, the suffragists were divided in their loyalties. Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton formed the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA). Along with her husband and Julia Ward Howe, she formed the more moderate American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA). In 1870, she and her husband organized the New England Woman Suffrage Association. In 1887, she proposed a merger of AWSA and NWSA. Working with Susan B. Anthony, the two groups were merged in 1890 to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). She died in 1893, but her eldest daughter, who was also a prominent suffragist, later wrote her biography. Who was she?

 

a. Charlotte Forten Grimké

b. Lucy Stone

c. Carrie Clifford

d. Frances M. Abbott

 

Links for Her Story: A Woman Suffrage Catechism

                             Pioneer of Woman's Rights

 

 

 

Q14. What’s Her Story?

 

January 14 — For the 1848 Woman’s Rights Convention, she wrote The Declaration of Sentiments, modeled after The Declaration of Independence, in which she proposed the right to vote for women. Frederick Douglass was the only convention attendee who initially supported her proposal for women's suffrage, but his eloquent speech swayed the other attendees. The Declaration of Sentiments was approved by 68 women and 32 men at the Woman’s Rights Convention. Although her seven children kept her busy at home, she was a long-time partner with Susan B. Anthony in the fight for women's suffrage. In 1869, she and Anthony formed the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA). They split with Frederick Douglass when the Fifteenth Amendment gave black men the right to vote, but not women. In 1990, at the urging of Susan B. Anthony, she became the first president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). In 1892, she gave her "Solitude of Self" speech to Committee of the Judiciary of the United States Congress. She wrote The Woman's Bible in 1895. Who was she?

 

a. Martha C. Wright

b. Elizabeth Cady Stanton

c. Jane Hunt

d. Mary Ann M'Clintock

 

Links for Her Story: Declaration of Sentiments

                             Solitude of Self

                             The Woman's Bible

                             Eighty Years And More: Reminiscences 1815-1897 

 

 

 

Q13. What’s Her Story?

 

January 13 — She was born on January 13, 1850 in New York City, where her father was a prominent abolitionist. In 1870, she became the second woman to enroll in Howard Law School. In 1872, she graduated from Howard and was the first African-American woman to become a lawyer. When she applied to be admitted to the law bar, she may have used her initials instead of her full name, to avoid being excluded because she was a woman. She became interested in the suffrage movement, and the National Woman Suffrage Association referred to her as an example of the "varied capacity of women for many employments". Who was she? 

 

a. Nellie Griswold Francis

b. Charlotte E. Ray

c. Mary D. Randolph

d. Mary Eliza Mahoney

 

Links for Her Story: Women of the Century

                             History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III

 

 

 

Q12. What’s Her Story?

 

January 12 — She was born in upstate New York on January 12, 1820. She graduated from the Female Seminary of Geneva, New York in 1835. In 1840, she married and moved with her husband to Cleveland, Ohio where she had five children. In 1850 and 1851, she attended several woman's rights conventions in Indiana and Ohio. As a result, she was asked to give a lecture on women's rights in Cleveland in 1853. In 1855, the family moved to Boston. In 1866, she helped to organize the American Equal Rights Association. And, in 1868, she founded the New England Woman's Club of Boston. This initiated the socially-progressive women's club movement, and she became known as the "Mother of Clubs". She helped to found the American Woman Suffrage Association in 1869. In 1875, she moved with her husband to Los Angeles, CA where she organized more women's clubs to promote women's rights. In 1911, at the age of 91, she was able to vote in California for the first time. Who was she?

 

a. Mary Wood Swift

b. Caroline M. Seymour Severance

c. Rebecca Spring

d. Mary S. Sperry

 

Links for Her Story: The Mother of Clubs

                             California Outlook

                             Eminent Women of the Age

                             The History of the Woman's Club Movement in America

 

 

 

Q11. What’s Her Story?

 

January 11 — She was born into a Quaker family on January 11, 1885 in Mount Laurel, NJ. In 1901, she graduated first in her class from Hicksite Friends school in Moorestown, NJ. The Hicksite Friends believed in gender equality as a central tenet of their religion. She earned a bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College in 1905 and a master's degree from University of Pennsylvania in 1907. In 1907, she went to England to continue her studies. There she met Lucy Burns and learned the tactics of the militant British suffragettes led by Emmeline Pankhurst. She returned to the US in 1910, completing her PhD at the University of Pennsylvania in 1912. She formed the National Woman's Party, which began picketing the White House for suffrage in 1917. In 1923, on the seventy-fifth anniversary of the First Women's Rights Convention in the US, she proposed the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). When she died in 1977, thirty-five of the requisite thirty-eight states had ratified the ERA. But, after her death, no additional states ratified the proposed constitutional amendment. Who was she?

 

a. Anita Pollitzer

b. Alice Paul

c. Crystal Eastman

d. Mabel Vernon

 

Links for Her Story: The Story of the Woman's Party

                             Woman Suffrage and the Equal Rights Amendment 

                             Life Magazine, September 4, 1970

 

 

 

Q10. What’s Her Story?

 

January 10 — On January 10, 1878, the Federal Woman Suffrage Amendment was first introduced to the US Congress. In 1917, on January 10, the suffragists led by Alice Paul started picketing the White House. Exactly one year after the picketing began and forty years after the Suffrage Amendment was first introduced, the US House of Representatives passed the amendment by precisely the required two-thirds majority on January 10, 1918. The Federal Woman Suffrage Amendment was drafted in 1875 by this woman, who was an abolitionist and devoted her life to suffrage for women. Who was she?

 

a. Lucretia Mott

b. Julia Ward Howe

c. Harriet Tubman

d. Susan B. Anthony

 

Links for Her StoryThe New York Times, January 11, 1878
                             The New York Times, January 11, 1917
                             The New York Times, January 11, 1918

 

 

 

Q9. What’s Her Story?

 

January 9 — She was born on January 9, 1859 in Ripon, WI, but in 1866 her family moved to Charles City, IA. In 1880, she graduated from the Iowa Agricultural College, the only woman in her class. In February 1885, she married and moved to San Francisco. After her husband died, she returned to Charles City in 1887 and joined the Iowa Woman Suffrage Association. In 1890 she remarried and spoke at the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) convention. In 1892, Susan B. Anthony asked her to speak at the Congressional hearings on suffrage. She was handpicked by Susan B. Anthony to lead NAWSA beginning in 1900. And, in 1902, she founded the International Woman Suffrage Alliance (IWSA). But, she resigned the presidency of NAWSA in 1904 to care for her ailing husband. After he died in 1905 and Susan B. Anthony died in 1906, she travelled worldwide promoting suffrage for women. In 1915, she assumed leadership of NAWSA again and remained its president until after the Nineteenth Amendment became the law of the land. In 1920, on the eve of the one-hundredth anniversary of Susan B. Anthony's birth, she founded the League of Women Voters. Who was she?

 

a. Carrie Chapman Catt

b. Harriet Taylor Upton

c. Alva Erskine Belmont

d. Maud Wood Park

 

Links for Her Story: Time Magazine, June 14, 1926

Woman Suffrage and Politics: The Inner Story of the Suffrage Movement 

 

 

 

Q8. What’s Her Story?

 

January 8 — She was an abolitionist and the younger sister of Lucretia Mott. She was one of five women, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Martha C. Wright, Mary Ann M'Clintock, and Jane Hunt, who met in Waterloo, New York at the home of Jane and Richard Hunt on July 9, 1848. These five women planned the First Woman’s Rights Convention in the US held on July 19 and 20, 1848 at the Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls, NY. Prior to the emancipation of the slaves, her home was used by the "underground railroad", and she frequently allowed fugitive slaves to sleep in the kitchen, including slaves led to freedom by Harriet Tubman. Who was she?

 

a. Martha C. Wright

b. Elizabeth Cady Stanton

c. Jane Hunt

d. Mary Ann M'Clintock

 

Links for Her Story: Women’s Rights, National Historical Park, New York

                             History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I

 

 

 

Q7. What’s Her Story?

 

January 7 — She was born in Poland in 1810 and came to the US in 1836. She then toured the country speaking against slavery and for equal rights for women, including the right to vote. In 1836, she began advocating for the right of women in New York State to own property. In 1840, she started working with Elizabeth Cady Stanton. She spoke at and helped to organize many of the women's rights conventions. As one of the first women to advocate for the right to vote, she traveled with Susan B. Anthony speaking on behalf of suffrage. Who was she?

 

a. Helen Chisaski

b. Ernestine L. Potowski Rose

c. Jennie Broneberg

d. Ruza Wenclawska

 

Links for Her Story: An Address on Woman's Rights

                             Review of Horace Mann's Two Lectures

 

 

 

Q6. What’s Her Story?

 

January 6 — She was born in Scotland in 1795. In 1818, she came to the US and toured the country with her sister. She published her letters from that tour in the book, Views of Society and Manners in America. In 1826, she and Robert Owen published a paper proposing complete equal rights for women, including suffrage for women. For several years, she toured the US promoting her ideas on equal rights and then published a book of her lectures. Who was she?

 

a. Mary Reed

b. Eliza A. Swain

c. Fanny Garrison Villard

d. Frances (Fanny) Wright

 

Links for Her Story: History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I

                             Views of Society and Manners in America

                             Tracts on Republican Government and National Education

                             Course of Popular Lectures

 

 

 

Q5. What’s Her Story?

 

January 5 — On January 5, 1835, she was born in a log cabin in Michigan. She attended Mount Holyoke College, but transferred and graduated from Antioch College. She decided to study for the ministry at St. Lawrence University, which was one of the few divinity schools that would admit women. She was ordained in 1863. When she was married ten years later, she kept her maiden name, which was practically unheard of, at the time. She campaigned for women's suffrage in Kansas and, later, in Wisconsin. In 1868, she helped to form the New England Woman's Suffrage Association. At the convention of the American Equal Rights Association in 1868, she debated Frederick Douglass on the question of suffrage for women and blacks. In 1887, she resigned as pastor to concentrate on the fight for suffrage for women. Becoming discouraged with the slow pace of suffrage, in 1913, she joined what would become the National Woman's Party. Although she was 82 years old, she picketed the White House on the cold, rain-drenched Inauguration Day for President Wilson's second term, March 4, 1917. Who was she?

 

a. Rev. Antoinette Brown

b. Rev. Alice Ball Loomis

c. Rev. Florence Spearing Randolph

d. Rev. Olympia Brown

 

Links for Her Story: Acquaintances, Old and New, Among Reformers

                             The Story of the Woman's Party

  

 

 

Q4. What’s Her Story?

 

January 4 — These sisters were born in Charleston, SC in 1792 and 1805. Their father was a slave owner who did not believe in rights for women. He served as chief judge on the South Carolina supreme court. The elder sister wanted to become a lawyer like her father. But, unlike her father, she fought against slavery and for women's rights. The younger sister was a mesmerizing orator and wrote Letters to Catherine E. Beecher: in reply to An Essay on Slavery and Abolitionism. In 1838, the elder sister wrote Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and the Condition of Woman. These sisters were among the first women to write and speak out publicly against slavery and for women's rights. Who were these sisters?

 

a. Margaretta and Sarah Forten

b. Sarah and Caroline Remond

c. Inez and Vida Milholland

d. Sarah and Angelina Grimké

 

Links for Her Story:

Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and the Condition of Woman

Letters to Catherine E. Beecher: in reply to An Essay on Slavery and Abolitionism

 

 

 

Q3. What’s Her Story?

 

January 3 — She was born on January 3, 1793 in Nantucket, MA to a Quaker family. She was a Quaker preacher, and a political and social reformer involved in the abolition, temperance, and pacifism movements. In 1840, she was one of the six American women who were official delegates to the World Anti-Slavery Conference in London. But, the women were denied the right to participate just because they were women. At that Anti-Slavery Conference, she first met Elizabeth Cady Stanton. She was one of the five women who planned the first Woman's Rights Convention in the US in 1848. Who was she?

 

a. Martha C. Wright

b. Mary Ann M'Clintock

c. Jane Hunt

d. Lucretia Mott

 

Links for Her Story: The Library of Congress, American Memory

                             Discourse on Woman

                             Life and Letters

 

 

 

Q2. What’s Her Story?

 

January 2 — Before the signing of Declaration of Independence, on March 31, 1776 she wrote a letter to her husband, who was attending the Continental Congress in Philadelphia. The letter included the following excerpt:

 

"—I long to hear that you have declared an independancy—and by the way in the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favourable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If perticuliar care and attention is not paid to the Laidies we are determined to foment a Rebelion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation."

 

Who was she?

 

a. Betsy Ross

b. Martha Washington

c. Abigail Adams

d. Dolley Madison

 

Links for Her Story: The Massachusetts Historical Society

                             Familiar Letters

 

 

 

Q1. What’s Her Story?

 

January 1 — She was a businesswoman and landowner in Maryland, born around 1600. She also acted as an attorney for Lord Baltimore. In January 1648, she asked the Maryland Assembly for two votes — one for herself and one for Lord Baltimore. Her request was denied because she was a woman. She was the first woman in the United States to request the right to vote. Who was she?

 

a. Margaret Brent

b. Virginia Dare

c. Anne Hutchinson

d. Sarah Good

 

Links for Her Story: History of Maryland, Volume II

                             Dames and Daughters of Colonial Days